Acupuncture Sports Injuries

Chinese martial artists, athletes, warriors, and soldiers have historically received acupuncture to improve stamina, endurance, and relieve pain. Today many athletes in professional sports have used acupuncture successfully for improved athletic performance and healing of acute and chronic injuries.

During the summer 2008 Beijing Olympics the China Ministry of Health set up a pavilion in the Olympic Village and offered free acupuncture to athletes and officials of the games – making it the first Olympic Village in history to do so.

Acupuncture helps to improve sports injuries weather Acute or Chronic by reducing inflammation, quickening the blood flow to the affected area, and boosting the immune system. Acupuncture has been found to be especially effective in treating common injuries for athletes like tendon and ligament sprains.

The available research evidence supports the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating sports injuries.

In the research study titled “The effects of acupuncture stimulation on recovery ability of male elite basketball players.” Is acupuncture an effective method for recovery from muscle fatigue?  Yes!. The results showed that the acupuncture group (using acupoints PC6 and ST36) had significantly lower heart rate, increased maximal aerobic capacity and lower blood lactic acid than both the sham and normal groups at 30 min post-exercise and at 60 min post-exercise blood lactic acid levels of the acupuncture group was also significantly lower than that of the other two groups.

Peilin (2002) records the TCM theory of injury due to excessive exercise. Exercise may deplete energy generally, including the qi, blood, yin and yang, leading to weakening of the defensive qi. This allows the body to become more vulnerable to external pathogenic factors, which in turn can lead to dysfunction of the zang-fu organs. In addition, overuse due to repetitive movements in certain sports like tennis and golf may cause weakness to local area muscles, tendons and ligaments, causing qi and blood deficiency and/or stagnation. The treatment of sports injuries are often a combination of modalities like acupuncture, herbal therapy, and other interventions, like physical therapy, and physical conditioning. Western medical therapies also integrate very well to achieve recovery.

Acute injuries happen suddenly these injuries involve the blockage of the free flow of qi, blood, and body fluids in the channels collaterals and zang/fu organs.

Chronic injuries happen over a period of time especially when an acute condition is not completely taken care of. These cases also involve conditions within the zang/fu organs such as qi deficiency, qi stagnation, blood deficiency, blood stagnation, damp-phlegm accumulation, and yin and/or yang deficiency, all of which give rise to wind, cold, damp invasion, exacerbating the condition and invasion of the collaterals. This is a Bi syndrome or painful obstruction syndrome.

From a historical perspective Chinese martial artists used Acupuncture for Sports Injuries to relieve pain after being injured. Athletes, warriors, and soldiers have historically received acupuncture to improve stamina and endurance. Today many athletes in professional sports have used acupuncture successfully for improved athletic performance and healing of acute and chronic injuries.

Acupuncture Sports Injuries

Reference:

SPORTS INJURIES and ACUPUNCTURE The evidence for effectiveness

Acupuncture Today: Sports Injuries: An Integrated Perspective By Ronda Wimmer, PhD, MS, LAc,

The Olympics Bring Attention to Acupuncture for Athletes by Healthy News – 8/22/2008

The acupuncture handbook of sports injuries and pain: a four step approach to treatment / Whitfield Reaves, Chad Bong.

Effects of acupuncture stimulation on recovery ability of male elite basketball athletes

Acupuncture and the Athlete

Big Men Little Needles: Acupuncture in the NFL

Acupuncture: Acupuncture Scores Points with Athletes

Why All Athletes Should Use Acupuncture

Effects of Acupuncture on Symptoms and Muscle Function in Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

A Brief History of Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion